Mission: Calle 24 Latino Cultural District

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Calle 24 Special Use District Presentation from February, 4th, Public Meeting

Click Below for Presentation

 Planning Commission Hearing on Calle 24 Special Use District

Thursday, February 9th

City Hall, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place , Room 400

Planning Commission Begins at Noon

http://sf-planning.org/planning-commission

NEW!  Restored Latin American Flags for Calle 24

Restoring Latin American Banners        PeruBanner

Accion Latina New Storefront and Gallery:  2958 24th Street

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Business Highlights:  Get to Know your Neighborhood Business

Diju Jewelry:   3247 24th Street

Produced by SFGov TV

La Torta Gorda:  2760 24th Street

Food Network found the top five sandwiches in the country, guess who’s #2 ?

Community Updates

Community Meeting: Updates on Latino Cultural District Projects

Saturday, February 4th, 2017 TBD

IIN Community Meeting Presentation Oct 17 2015

Neighborhood Summary

Lower 24th or Calle 24 ( Cah-yay  Veh-een-tee-KWAT-ro), running from Mission to Potrero streets, is located in the center of San Francisco’s Latino Cultural District. The corridor features a richness of culture and vibrancy unmatched anywhere else in the city. The corridor, with over 160 small businesses, is a bustling enclave for many Latino businesses including specialty food stores, restaurants, cafes, taquerias, Mexican bakeries, butchers, art galleries, and gift shops that serve the needs of local residents. The uniqueness of the area and multi-modal transportation options have proven attractive to new residents and new businesses, which are now calling Lower 24th home.

The district is an art and cultural mecca boasting the largest collection of murals in the city and hosting a multitude of events that enliven the neighborhood with history, spirituality, and community throughout the year. Lower 24th Street businesses, residents, arts organizations and long established non-profit agencies collaborate to organize events such as Carnaval, Cesar Chavez Parade and Festival, and Dia De Los Muertos (Day of the Dead).

With easy access to 24th Street BART Station, Muni bus lines, and the 101 Freeway, this beautiful tree-lined thoroughfare provides neighborhood residents and visitors many choices for traveling within San Francisco and throughout the region.

Lower 24th Street has a high level of social capital, featuring an active Merchants & Neighbors Association (Calle 24 SF) and many community-based arts, cultural, and social service organizations. There are opportunities to increase collaboration among merchants and arts and cultural organizations and among long-time businesses and those that are newer to the corridor.

Boundary

Latino Cultural District Resolution *

*Note the boundary was adjusted in a subsequent Board of Supervisor amendment 201-14, removing La Raza Park and Precita Park

Demographics - Lower 24th Street
Source: US Census Bureau, 2010 Census of Population and Housing

Archive:  2010 Lower 24th Street Economic Development Report

Customized Services

Along Lower 24th Street, Invest in Neighborhoods primarily focuses on the preservation and strengthening of the corridor’s existing businesses and cultural vitality. With these goals in mind we have developed programs to reduce business vulnerabilities and foster growth. In partnership with Calle 24 SF (the neighborhood’s merchant and neighbor association) we’ve conducted extensive outreach to merchants – including multi-lingual access to information and services – to learn about their needs and interests.  In response to what we’ve learned directly from businesses, we’ve piloted several new programs available to all storefront businesses and customized to their individual needs.  These include Biz Fit SF, a technical assistance program that provides professional business consulting advice free of cost; lease strengthening workshops and counseling that offer basics on understanding leases and securing a business’s future on the corridor; and the ADA Assessment Program which provides free Certified Access Specialist (CASp) inspections to  assist businesses in being compliant with the American’s with Disabilities Act and protect businesses from lawsuits.

These business assistance programs are complemented by a number of community efforts to recognize and preserve the neighborhood’s cultural assets and to maintain the diversity that has made this neighborhood so beloved by residents and visitors alike. Calle 24 SF along with other partners recently received approval from the Board of Supervisors for a resolution that recognized Calle 24 as a Latino Cultural District. As a continuation of that effort  an Invest in Neighborhoods grant awarded to Calle 24 SF to enable a public process to gather input on the mission, vision and goals of the Latino cultural district.  The process will also help prioritize projects such as neighborhood branding, historic documentation, and cultural events. The first community meeting for this process was held at Brava Theater on  September 13, 2014.

Other Neighborhood Projects

Calle 24 Latino Cultural District Website

SF Heritage Cuentos del Barrio Self Guided Walking Tour

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 Shop & Dine in the 49!

Shop and Dine in the 49!  Make a full day experience of shopping while you walk down our Calle 24 Latino Cultural District.

Dine Map

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Carnaval Mural Restoration

Precita Eyes Mural Tours

The Carnaval Mural located at S. Van Ness and 24th Street, above the House of Brakes (3195 24th Street),  is one of the most important public art projects in the Mission District. Throughout the years, the mural has become a symbol of history, culture, artistic expression and pride. For some people it is “the Golden Dreams of La Mision” and for others it is “the joy of life coming into the streets.” It has been more than 30 years since the iconic Carnaval Mural was originally painted; today the mural is more than ready for a major restoration. With funds from the City Community Challenge Grant, artists have the ability to undertake a much needed restoration project. The committee has been able to reunite most of the original artist that worked on the mural more than 30 years ago to restore this piece of history.

The Carnaval Mural is a focal point of the Calle 24 Latino Cultural District. In addition to the Carnaval Mural, in support and recognition of the Calle 24 Latino Cultural District, Mayor Ed Lee has committed $100,000 for the restoration of murals and banners within the district. The funds will be managed by the San Francisco Arts Commission.

San Francisco Heritage & San Francisco Latino Historical Society

Nuestra Historia: Documenting the Chicano, Latino, and Indígena Contribution to the Development of San Francisco

The City’s Historic Preservation Fund has funded the San Francisco Latino Historical Society in association with San Francisco Architectural Heritage a grant to develop a San Francisco Latino Historical Context Statement.  This effort branded Nuestra HistoriaDocumenting the Chicano, Latino, and Indígena Contributions to the Development of San Francisco is a community-based project that will document the history of the Latino community in San Francisco by examining and identifying places and events of significance to San Francisco’s Latino population, including landmarks in Lower 24th Street. The project will culminate in a written report called a “historic context statement” that will chronicle Latino history as it pertains to the physical and cultural landscape of San Francisco. It will offer recommendations on how best to preserve and maintain architectural, cultural, and historical resources important to Latino history.